Zimbabwe’s ruling Zanu-PF wins majority

Zimbabwe’s ruling Zanu-PF party appears set to win a majority in parliament after capturing 109 seats so far in national elections, the country’s electoral commission announced Wednesday.

The main opposition Movement for Democratic Change party has won only 41 seats so far. A total of 210 seats were contested.

Zanu-PF is led by President Emmerson Mnangagwa, who took power after Robert Mugabe’s 37-year rule ended under the pressure of a military takeover in November 2017.

According to the electoral commission, 70% of registered voters cast ballots.

The commission has said it would only announce the result of the presidential vote once all 10,985 polling stations verified their results.

Both Mnangagwa and Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) leader Nelson Chamisa hinted they were ahead on Tuesday in the country’s first election without the name of former ruler Robert Mugabe on the ballot.

Mnangagwa, 75, who took power after helping to orchestrate a de facto coup against Mugabe in November, said he was receiving “extremely positive” information on the election. Meanwhile, Chamisa, 40, said his party was poised for victory.

Commission Chairperson Justice Priscilla Chigumba told reporters in Harare on Tuesday that the commission was confident there was no cheating or rigging in the largely peaceful vote. Observers were present to monitor the election for the first time in years, including 20 teams from the US Embassy in Harare.

A report published by African Union observers Wednesday said that “by and large, the process was peaceful and well-administered

Chamisa — the country’s youngest ever presidential candidate — who took over the MDC leadership following the death of its founder Morgan Tsvangirai in February, tweeted on Tuesday that his party had done “exceedingly well.”

During the campaign, Chamisa aimed to appeal to younger voters with promises of electoral reform, tax cuts and jobs.

While his message may strike a chord, he does not have the same level of backing from the security forces or military who oversaw Mugabe’s departure.

But both men face a mighty challenge to help the country recover from the dire economic situation that was inflicted upon it by Mugabe’s rule

Why I quit APC – Senate President Bukola.

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The Senate President, Abubakar Bukola Saraki has given reasons why he has dumped the All Progressive Congress, APC, party for the Peoples Democratic Party, PDP.

Saraki had made his defection known through his twitter handle. Saraki gave his reasons for dumping the APC to include continued persecutions he has been put through in the APC. Below is his full defection statement. “I wish to inform Nigerians that, after extensive consultations, I have decided to take my leave of the All Progressives Congress (APC). This is not a decision that I have made lightly. If anything at all, I have tarried for so long and did all that was humanly possible, even in the face of great provocation, ridicule and flagrant persecution, to give opportunity for peace, reconciliation and harmonious existence. Perhaps, more significantly, I am mindful of the fact that I carry on my shoulder a great responsibility for thousands of my supporters, political associates and friends, who have trusted in my leadership and have attached their political fortunes to mine. However, it is after an extensive consultation with all the important stakeholders that we have come to this difficult but inevitable decision to pitch our political tent elsewhere; where we could enjoy greater sense of belonging and where the interests of the greatest number of our Nigerians would be best served. While I take full responsibility for this decision, I will like to emphasise that it is a decision that has been inescapably imposed on me by certain elements and forces within the APC who have ensured that the minimum conditions for peace, cooperation, inclusion and a general sense of belonging did not exist. They have done everything to ensure that the basic rules of party administration, which should promote harmonious relations among the various elements within the party were blatantly disregarded. All governance principles which were required for a healthy functioning of the party and the government were deliberately violated or undermined. And all entreaties for justice, equity and fairness as basic precondition for peace and unity, not only within the party, but also the country at large, were simply ignored, or employed as additional pretext for further exclusion. The experience of my people and associates in the past three years is that they have suffered alienation and have been treated as outsiders in their own party. Thus, many have become disaffected and disenchanted. At the same time, opportunities to seek redress and correct these anomalies were deliberately blocked as a government-within-a-government had formed an impregnable wall and left in the cold, everyone else who was not recognized as “one of us”. This is why my people, like all self-respecting people would do, decided to seek accommodation elsewhere. I have had the privilege to lead the Nigerian legislature in the past three years as the President of the Senate and the Chairman of the National Assembly. The framers of our constitution envisage a degree of benign tension among the three arms of government if the principle of checks and balances must continue to serve as the building block of our democracy. In my role as the head of the legislature, and a leader of the party, I have ensured that this necessary tension did not escalate at any time in such a way that it could encumber Executive function or correspondingly, undermine the independence of the legislature. Over the years, I have made great efforts in the overall interest of the country, and in spite of my personal predicament, to manage situations that would otherwise have resulted in unsavoury consequences for the government and the administration. My colleagues in the Senate will bear testimony to this. However, what we have seen is a situation whereby every dissent from the legislature was framed as an affront on the executive or as part of an agenda to undermine the government itself. The populist notion of anti-corruption became a ready weapon for silencing any form of dissent and for framing even principled objection as “corruption fighting back”. Persistent onslaught against the legislature and open incitement of the people against their own representatives became a default argument in defence of any short-coming of the government in a manner that betrays all too easily, a certain contempt for the Constitution itself or even the democracy that it is meant to serve. Unfortunately, the self-serving gulf that has been created between the leadership of the two critical arms of government based on distrust and mutual suspicion has made any form of constructive engagement impossible. Therefore, anything short of a slavish surrender in a way that reduces the legislature to a mere rubber stamp would not have been sufficient in procuring the kind of rapprochement that was desired in the interest of all. But I have no doubt in my mind, that to surrender this way is to be complicit in the subversion of the institution that remains the very bastion of our democracy. I am a democrat. And I believe that anyone who lays even the most basic claim to being a democrat will not accept peace on those terms; which seeks to compromise the very basis of our existence as the parliament of the people. The recent weeks have witnessed a rather unusual attempts to engage with some of these most critical issues at stake. Unfortunately, the discord has been allowed to fester unaddressed for too long, with dire consequences for the ultimate objective of delivering the common good and achieving peace and unity in our country. Any hope of reconciliation at this point was therefore very slim indeed. Most of the horses had bolted from the stable. The emergence of a new national party executives a few weeks ago held out some hopes, however slender. The new party chairman has swung into action and did his best alongside some of the Governors of APC and His Excellency, the Vice President. I thank them for all their great efforts to save the day and achieve reconciliation. Even though I thought these efforts were coming late in the day, but seeing the genuine commitment of these gentlemen, I began to think that perhaps it was still possible to reconsider the situation. However, as I have realized all along, there are some others in the party leadership hierarchy, who did not think dialogue was the way forward and therefore chose to play the fifth columnists. These individuals went to work and ensured that they scuttled the great efforts and the good intentions of these aforementioned leaders of the party. Perhaps, had these divisive forces not thrown the cogs in the wheel at the last minutes, and in a manner that made it impossible to sustain any trust in the process, the story today would have been different. For me, I leave all that behind me. Today, I start as I return to the party where I began my political journey, the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP). When we left the PDP to join the then nascent coalition of All Progressives Congress (APC) in 2014, we left in a quest for justice, equity and inclusion; the fundamental principles on which the PDP was originally built but which it had deviated from. We were attracted to the APC by its promise of change. We fought hard along with others and defeated the PDP. In retrospect, it is now evident that the PDP has learnt more from its defeat than the APC has learnt from its victory. The PDP that we return to is now a party that has learnt its lessons the hard way and have realized that no member of the party should be taken for granted; a party that has realized that inclusion, justice and equity are basic precondition for peace; a party that has realized that never again can the people of Nigeria be taken for granted. I am excited by the new efforts, which seeks to build the reborn PDP on the core principles of promoting democratic values; internal democracy; accountability; inclusion and national competitiveness; genuine commitment to restructuring and devolution of powers; and an abiding belief in zoning of political and elective offices as an inevitable strategy for managing our rich diversity as a people of one great indivisible nation called Nigeria. What we have all agreed is that a deep commitment to these ideals were not only a demonstration of our patriotism but also a matter of enlightened self-interest, believing that our very survival as political elites of this country will depend on our ability to earn the trust of our people and in making them believe that, more than anything else, we are committed to serving the people. What the experience of the last three years have taught us is that the most important task that we face as a country is how to reunite our people. Never before had so many people in so many parts of our country felt so alienated from their Nigerianness. Therefore, we understand that the greatest task before us is to reunite the county and give everyone a sense of belonging regardless of region or religion.   Every Nigerian must have an instinctive confidence that he or she will be treated with justice and equity in any part of the country regardless of the language they speak or how they worship God. This is the great task that trumps all. Unless we are able to achieve this, all other claim to progress no matter how defined, would remain unsustainable This is the task that I am committing myself to and I believe that it is in this PDP, that I will have the opportunity to play my part.  It is my hope that the APC will respect the choice that I have made as my democratic right, and understand that even though we will now occupy a different political space, we do not necessarily become enemies unto one another.

Breaking: Nigeria’s serving ambassador to South Africa Ibeto defects from APC.

According to the report, Ibeto reportedly arrived Nigeria from Pretoria, South Africa, on Sunday, July 29, and in the morning of Monday, July 30, he handed over his letter of resignation at the external affairs ministry. The report however said it could not confirm if Ibeto saw President Muhammadu Buhari before returning to Minna, the capital of Niger state. READ ALSO: Saraki, Dogara react to planned impeachment of Ortom by 8 lawmakers Ibeto was a former deputy governor of Niger state under the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), the party he returned to as reported by Daily Sun on Tuesday, July 31. As deputy governor for eight years, Ibeto worked with Muazu Babangida Aliyu.

He dumped the PDP for the APC in the heat of the 2015 general elections after he lost the party’s primary. The report said Ibeto is currently going through the process of obtaining his PDP membership card from his ward in Ibeto town, Magma local government area of the state. NAIJ.com earlier reported that Governor Samuel Ortom of Benue state officially announced his resignation from the All Progressives Congress (APC). The governor made the announcement at the Government House, Makurdi, hours after some Benue youths blocked his convoy, preventing him from visiting APC national chairman, Comrade Adams Oshiomhole, in Abuja.